Study Highlights the Link Between Socioeconomic Position and DNA Methylation.

Miniature-concept-of-rich-and-poor-people-standing-on-piles-of-coins | Feature | Study Highlights the Link Between Socioeconomic Position and DNA Methylation.

Socioeconomic position (SEP) includes income and financial security and educational attainment, and personal perceptions of social class and social status.

Thanks to the study of epigenetics, aging biomarkers can now help us understand how deep-rooted socioeconomic position inequalities influence aging. Essentially a promising new set of DNAm methylation (DNAm)-based aging biomarkers stipulate through their age acceleration (AA) measures, to examine if biological aging is faster or slower than chronological aging.

Accelerated DNA methylation age is linked to all-cause mortality and environmental factors. Some studies have suggested that living in certain neighborhoods with a higher deprivation index will show up in methylation-based markers of aging, but the studies are few and far between.

Read the original publication of this study here: [ Life course socioeconomic position and DNA methylation age acceleration in mid-life ]

This study aimed to investigate the association between socioeconomic position and DNAm methylation through age acceleration.

 

Contrast-concept-of-rich-and-poor-men | Study Highlights the Link Between Socioeconomic Position and DNA Methylation.

 

Life course socioeconomic position and DNA methylation age acceleration in mid-life

An examination into the linear regression was carried out on the sex-adjusted relationships of the following:

  • Adult social class
  • Childhood social class
  • Intergenerational social class change
  • Education
  • Adult household earnings

 

Data was studied on first (Horvath AA and Hannum AA) and second-generation (PhenoAge AA and GrimAge AA) DNAm AA markers using data from the MRC National Survey of Health and Development.

It was found that there was little evidence of any associations with Horvath AA in the first-generation biomarkers. Still, associations of childhood social class and income with Hannum AA were observed. However, strong associations were seen between people experiencing more significant disadvantages in childhood and adult socioeconomic position. It also showed a greater AA in the second generation biomarkers.

Subjects whose fathers worked in an unskilled occupational social class during their childhood had a PhenoAge AA 3.6 years greater (95% CI 1.8 to 5.4) than those with fathers from a professional social class. Individuals without qualifications had higher AA compared with those with higher education (4.1 years greater GrimAge AA (95% CI 3.1 to 5.0)).

 

Takeaways:

  • The study highlighted how social disadvantages in childhood may affect the biological aging process.
  • The second-generation clocks appear to be more sensitive to markers showing the accumulation of social disadvantage across the course of their lives.

 

You can read the original publication of this study here: [ Life course socioeconomic position and DNA methylation age acceleration in mid-life ]

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